Don't just stand there and shout it!

\o/ Happy Birthday, Mart you big lug, you! Thank you for all the wonderful years of music bliss! MWAH

fonniewallaby:

Ahahahah! Together. <3

fonniewallaby:

Ahahahah! Together. <3

Egg Nebula CRL 2688&#160;
A proto-planetary nebula in the constellation Cygnus. The central star of the Egg was a red giant until a few hundred years ago. It then began shedding its outer layers, which today are visible as a cloud of matter about 0.6 light-year across.Observations by the Hubble Space Telescope have shown bright arcs of matter within the cloud, almost like tree-rings, that reveal the way in which the rate of mass ejection from the central star has varied throughout its recent period of mass-loss. Hubble has also shown starlight escaping in narrow, oppositely-directed beams through holes in the circumstellar cocoon. The beams may result from shadows cast by blobs of material distributed within the region of ring-like holes that are carved out by a wobbling, high-speed stream of matter. Alternatively, they may be due to starlight reflected off fine jet-like streams of matter being ejected from the center and confined to the walls of a conical region around the symmetry axis. Both theories call for the ejection of high-speed material in a narrow beam by some mechanism that isn&#8217;t properly understood. Similar fine jets have been seen in the Cat&#8217;s Eye Nebula.
Source: daviddarling.info

Egg Nebula CRL 2688 

A proto-planetary nebula in the constellation Cygnus. The central star of the Egg was a red giant until a few hundred years ago. It then began shedding its outer layers, which today are visible as a cloud of matter about 0.6 light-year across.

Observations by the Hubble Space Telescope have shown bright arcs of matter within the cloud, almost like tree-rings, that reveal the way in which the rate of mass ejection from the central star has varied throughout its recent period of mass-loss. Hubble has also shown starlight escaping in narrow, oppositely-directed beams through holes in the circumstellar cocoon. The beams may result from shadows cast by blobs of material distributed within the region of ring-like holes that are carved out by a wobbling, high-speed stream of matter. Alternatively, they may be due to starlight reflected off fine jet-like streams of matter being ejected from the center and confined to the walls of a conical region around the symmetry axis. Both theories call for the ejection of high-speed material in a narrow beam by some mechanism that isn’t properly understood. Similar fine jets have been seen in the Cat’s Eye Nebula.

Source: daviddarling.info

Source: Out There Design

Source: Out There Design

thesillyinside:

Pool Party Guide.

This beautiful image of dust, is from of the region surrounding the reflection nebula Messier 78 (NGC 2068), just to the north of Orion’s Belt. When viewed by Submillimetre-wavelength APEX (Atacama Pathfinder Experiment) telescope, observations are overlaid on the visible-light image in orange.  
Credit: ESO/APEX (MPIfR/ESO/OSO)

This beautiful image of dust, is from of the region surrounding the reflection nebula Messier 78 (NGC 2068), just to the north of Orion’s Belt. When viewed by Submillimetre-wavelength APEX (Atacama Pathfinder Experiment) telescope, observations are overlaid on the visible-light image in orange.  

Credit: ESO/APEX (MPIfR/ESO/OSO)

This picture of the star formation region NGC 3582 was taken using the Wide Field Imager at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile. The image reveals giant loops of gas ejected by dying stars that bear a striking resemblance to solar prominences.

This picture of the star formation region NGC 3582 was taken using the Wide Field Imager at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile. The image reveals giant loops of gas ejected by dying stars that bear a striking resemblance to solar prominences.